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Full text of "Oxford Orphanage : a home for homeless children."






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ESTABLISHED IN DECEMBER', 1872, by 
the Grand Lodge of Masons of North 
Carolina, under a resolution introduced 
by John H. Mills, the original orphanage 
worker in North Carolina. 

THE CONDITIONS OF ADMISSION of 
the white orphan children of North Carolina 
are: 

That they are really destitute and 

homeless; 
That they are sound in body and mind; 
That they are not over twelve years of 
age. 

THE BENEFITS of the Orphanage are 
not, and never have been, restricted to the 
children of Masons alone. Only about 15 
per cent, of the children on roll are of 
Masonic parentage. 

OVER THREE THOUSAND boys and 
girls have been offered a home in Oxford 
Orphanage during the 42 years of its min- 
istry, and about 360 are now accepting its 
benefits. 

THE ORPHANAGE PLANT consists of 
about 242 acres of land, nine cottages, main 
school building, administration building, 
dining hall and kitchen, Treasurer's home, 
three industrial buildings, hospital and two 
farmer's houses, also barns and stables; 
18 of the buildings being of brick. The 
estimated value of the plant is about 
$250,000. 



SOME OF THE AIMS of Oxford Orphan- 
age, briefly stated, are to provide a tempo- 
rary home and the physical necessaries of 
life for orphan children, to prepare them 
as best it can in its school and industrial 
departments for fighting the battles of life 
and the highest Christian service, to instill 
into their minds and hearts high ideals, 
right motives, correct and intelligent modes 
of living, to respect the rignts of others, 
to help the weaker brother and to make 
use of all the opportunities In life. Train- 
ing for girls is given in domestic science, 
cottage work, dining rooms and kitchen, 
laundry and sewing rooms; for boys in 
the printing office, woodworking shop, shoe 
shop, dairy, bake room and; on the farm; 
also, a course in telegraphy and typewrit- 
ing is offered both boys and girls. 

SOME IDEA OF THE WORK being 
accomplished may be gained from a few 
facts. Nineteen of the girls who have left 
the Institution during the past ten years 
are now teaching in the schools of the 
State; three more who taught several years 
are married; twelve are studying in 
higher schools; eleven others are in dif- 
ferent hospitals preparing to be trained 
nurses, while five graduate nurses are at 
work or have homes of their own. One 
boy is a Methodist preacher, one a lawyer, 
four are telegraph operators, one being in 
the office of Assistant Superintendent of 
the Western Union, in New York City. 
Numbers of others are in their own or 



foster homes, and at work, living exemplary, 
Christian lives — a credit to the communities 
in which they live — to say nothing of the 
large number ' who left the Institution 
prior to ten years ago, many of whom are 
occupying prominent positions in religious, 
professional or business life. 

THE SUM TOTAL OF RESULTS, from 
this work, however, can never be measured 
in this life. To bring sunshine and happi- 
ness into a darkened life and inspire it with 
hope and promise; to make a better world 
in which to live; to be of service to others 
and to save immortal souls is the mission 
of Oxford Orphanage. There is every 
reason to believe that the God of truth and 
righteousness has set His seal of approval 
on this work, and is speaking and working 
in and through an Institution like this. 
What greater incentive could there possibly 
be to encourage unselfish and benevolent 
gifts and deeds? 

INASMUCH AS YE HAVE DONE IT unto 
one of the least of these, my brethren, ye 
have done it unto me. — Matt. 25:40. 



STATE LIBRARY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



3 3091 00747 9629